Upcoming Events

Cooking Matters Classes

May 4th & 18th,
June 1st, 15th & 29th,
July 13th

6-8pm

Must register at
(517)543-2310

Communion

May 7th

11am Service

Pantries

May 12th & 26th

10am-12pm

Discover Dimondale Day

May 13th

10am-5pm

Stuff the Blue Goose
Collecting food for Pantry

May 13th

10am-2pm

Memorial Day Parade
& Services

May 29th

11am start time

Barbeque Chicken Dinner

May 29th

After parade & services


 

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  • Pastor Scott

    From the Pastor

    Rev. Scott Crane

    Tending to Our Spiritual Growth

    It seems that many around the village are enjoying the warmer days that we have been experiencing. Many are out for walks. Others have been working outside. Long lines form at the village ice cream store in the evening.

    I decided to spend time rearranging the landscape in the front of my house. First, I took and transported some small bushes from the front to the side. I then cut down hedges that had gotten unruly and dug up their roots. After these items were cleared out, I took a weed eater and attempted to clean everything a bit. Next ahead is to totally clear out any remaining grass and weeds, then turn over the soil in preparation for some patio stones and flowers. It is quite the process and Iím even been doing some searches on computer to look at potential options for what grows well in Michigan.

    While I have gotten excited about this work and its potential, I realized that it doesnít just happen in one day. It takes a lot of work. And you donít take out hedges easily. The roots can be quite complicated, requiring both a shovel and saw at various times. It was interesting to see how quickly I could cut off the branches above ground but, then, went into slow mode addressing that which lay beneath the soil. There was quite a tangled mess that I had to work my way through.

    This grappling with hedges and plants got me thinking about our lives. We have things going on that others can see and, yet, we also have things happening in our lives that are not known to others. These personal and private things are much like the roots that I encountered. They can be quite complicated and intertwined in so many ways. We need to tend, not just to the showy, flowery side of our lives that bloom but, more importantly, to the rootsÖthatís where the intricate part of life lies.

    Yes, roots can be quite extensive and not easy to deal with. But roots are the source of nourishment and give the plants stability in the soil for long term survival and growth. Good plants come from good roots.

    What are the roots in our lives? What things need to be tended but are often avoided because they feel uncomfortable or take too much effort? When we think of what is foundational (our roots), as individuals, in the church and in the community, where should we be giving more of our attention? And how our roots interconnected with others in ways that we need to be aware?

    I ask these questions because I think, in our culture and social media, we have become obsessed with what things look like to the point of forgetting about what is most important. Simply put, for many, appearance is more important than substance. Superficiality often ends up winning out over integrity.

    I would hope that, in the rush of things and ever-increasing changes in technology, we donít lose sight of what is most important in life. Good, healthy life does not just happen because we wish it so. It happens with intentional and committed efforts at nurturing our souls. I hope that we learn to take the same care with our spiritual roots and growth as we do with our flower and vegetable gardens. If we learn to do that well, what blooms might we produce for Godís kingdom? Think of the potential that God has planted in us!

    Grace & Peace,
    Pastor Scott